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A “Heavenly” Question about Colors

10 Feb

I never desire to include off-color humor here. I want to bring honor to God and not be crude or distasteful. Today, I’m offering some COLORFUL clean jokes:

Q: Where do crayons go on vacation? … A: Color-ado.

Q: What kind of berry has a coloring book? … A: A crayon-berry.

Q: What happened when the red ship crashed into the blue ship? … A: The crew was marooned.

Ok, that’s enough. Oh, maybe one more… a riddle.

There were four houses on a street. The red house was made from brick. A purple house was made from brick, and the yellow house was also made from brick. What was the greenhouse made from?

A: Glass!

Did you get it right? LOL.

I used to paint, and it was fun to play around with color. I love to fine-tune color selections. So I’m always touched by videos of people who are completely color-blind. But when they wear amazing special glasses, they weep or are so deeply affected when they see the variety of colors they’ve never seen before.

Here is one heartwarming example of two colorblind brothers who see colors correctly for the first time. And here’s another that explains the struggle of the nearly 300 million people—mostly men—who are colorblind.

We do take color for granted.

I’ve long been fascinated by color, which is one reason I was a color consultant for a couple of years. I loved to study the interplay of colors and skin undertones.

But I think my fascination began in high school. One of my favorite classes was chemistry. As we learned about the elements and their atomic numbers, I studied Chromium (Cr), the element with the atomic number 24.  Although silver in appearance, chromium—when used as a catalyst—created Chromium compounds that are highly valued as pigments for their vivid colors.

But that’s getting too technical … let me keep this post simple.

Though I am not colorblind, I think I have not even begun to see the colors the Creator has made. Lately I’ve been astounded by sunsets in California and I’ve posted on Facebook about them. Amazing colors (like the one you see to the right).

That night I said to my husband, “If it’s so beautiful here sometimes, what must heaven be like?”

I have a question for you:

What color do you think of when you think of heaven?

When I think of heaven, I normally think of “streets of gold” and the glory of God—so I tend to think in terms of brilliant yellows.

But there are other colors mentioned in the Bible in regard to heaven.

Yes, there are “WHITE robes” (Revelation 7:13)—garments made white (pure) by being washed in the blood of the Lamb. (Hmmm… let that color picture sink in for a minute!)

We also see the 24 elders in heaven dressed in white clothes with gold crowns (Revelation 4:4), and Jesus said the righteous will wear white clothes (Revelation 3:4-5, 18).

Beyond white, have you ever noticed that GREEN rainbow around God’s throne? (Revelation 4:3)

And consider the vivid JEWEL tones of the great City, “Jerusalem the Holy” (Revelation 21:10, 12, 18-20). To get just a glimpse of that, imagine all the colors on typical Christmas trees. Now multiply that big time. Imagine the joy!

Here’s an interesting one. Consider all the colors of PEOPLE groups in heaven! (Revelation 7:9) As children we likely sang, “Red and yellow black and white, they are precious in His sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.”

But people are many more colors than that! People are snow white, ivory, cream, buttermilk, beige, tan, golden, amber, sepia, chestnut, chocolate, cocoa, onyx, black—and countless other colors.

The variety of people colors is incredible, and all are beautiful. 

The past few years, I’ve watched with interest the “coloring” phenomenon in Bibles and journaling.

Pam Farrel—my co-author of LOL with God—recently co-authored a Bible study with Jean E. Jones. The book, Discovering Hope in the Psalms, includes a creative artistic aspect. Pam says she colors and draws when she studies scripture, and especially when she memorizes scriptures, because the colors help her “remember.” In other words, they make a big impression in her brain.

Something I’ve only thought about recently: We see colors because we see light. 

The “Prince of Preachers,” Charles Spurgeonwrote,

Light is the cause of beauty. That is obvious to you all. Take the light away, and there is no beauty anywhere. The fairest woman charms the eye no more than a heap of ashes when the sun has departed. Your garden may be bright with many colored flowers, but when the sun goes down, you cannot know them from the grass which borders them. You look upon the trees, all fair with the greenness of summer—but when the sun goes down, they are all hung in black.

Without light,” he said, “no radiance flashes from the sapphire, no peaceful ray proceeds from the pearl. There is nothing of beauty left when light is gone. Light is the mother of beauty. In such sense, the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the light of Heaven—that is to say, all the beauty of the saints above comes from God incarnate—their excellence, their joy, their triumph, their glory, their ecstatic bliss all spring from Him.” (C. H. Spurgeon, “The Lamb—the Light”)

There will be colors in heaven we can’t even begin to  imagine now.

I think of all the colors in my Ultimate Crayon Collection—152 colors! Yet that is a puny representation of all the colors God has created.

One of my favorite Bible teachers was J. Vernon McGee, who is now seeing the beauty of heaven firsthand. He once said in a program on his Through the Bible radio series,

“What a thing of beauty! Varied hues and tints form a galaxy of rainbow colors. … The New Jerusalem is a city of light and a city of color.”  (J. Vernon McGee, “Homesick for Heaven)

Creation began with “Let there be light” (Genesis 1:1-5), and in that light God made it possible for us to see color.

Imagine the unspeakable joy when we live in our perfected bodies in His presence and see the entire spectrum of His colorful creativity.

“…no mere man has ever seen, heard or even imagined what God has ready for those who love the Lord” (2 Cor. 2:9, LB).

Even as people who are colorblind weep when they see colors for the first time, don’t you think we will weep tears of joy when we see the colors of heaven?

Go outside and take in some of the loveliness of God’s creation today.

All graphics, except sunset, adapted and courtesy of Pixabay.


Whatever Your House, Make It a Home

29 Aug

Martha Bolton and Brad Dickson wrote that there are Seven Signs You’ve Made a Bad Real-Estate Investment:

  1. The words “as is” appear 749 times in the contract.
  2. The home warranty expires in thirty-six hours. And that’s the extended warranty.
  3. During the final walk-through, the home inspector falls through a hole in the roof. And on the insurance report, you have to clarify which hole.
  4. The crown moldings turn out to be made of actual mold.
  5. The sellers apparently did not realize the toilets and doorknobs were part of the deal and took them all with them.
  6. The address is 4369 San Andreas Fault Drive.
  7. That almanac-sized bundle of paper the sellers left behind turns out to be the final disclosure statement. (1)

Most of that will not be as surprised by a home we buy (or even an apartment we rent). We’re careful, knowing that our investment is a big one!

But regardless the size or “bones” of your house, you can always turn it into a home. Some of the most Home Welcome Matinteresting programs on television are the home-makeover-type shows. There’s something satisfying about seeing a drab or even an OK home become glamorous and inviting.

I (Dawn) have a number of books on homemaking and hospitality in my library. Years ago, I read Karen Mains’ Open Heart~Open Home. My new favorite is Practicing Hospitality by Pat Ennis and Lisa Tatlock. But the other day, I pulled out a book I got a few years ago that radically changed my perspective.

In The Warm and Welcome Home by Quin Sherrer, a woman named Mary Jo offered to help the author give her house a face-lift. After Sherrer gave her cart blanche to move forward, Mary Jo told her that God had “already supplied” what would be needed for the makeover. Most women have “accessories hidden in their closet, attic, or garage, or under the bed,” Mary Jo said ~ and those were the places she would look!

Not wanting Mary Jo to claw through her stuff, Sherrer rummaged through things herself and pulled out all the “extras” that seemed useable for the makeover.

Sure enough, Mary Jo arrived ready for D-day (“decorating day”)…. and Continue reading

Better than Botox

10 Jul

Phyllis DillerPhyllis Diller’s self-deprecating humor (when she kept it clean) often made me (Dawn) laugh. She once said,  “My photographs don’t do me justice ~ they just look like me.” I’ve used that line myself on occasion.

Arlene Pellicane wrote about Diller in one chapter of her book, 31 Days to a Younger You. [Note: You can get Arlene’s book at love-wise under “Books/Products by Other Authors.”]

Discussing the topic of “Plastic Surgery, Botox, and Other Modern Marvels,” Pellicane began by sharing some of Diller’s humor, noting that the comedian was never one to conceal her facelifts.

“Her one liners about plastic surgery brought her fame and endeared her to women and plastic surgeons alike,” Arlene said.

“Punch lines like:

  • The only parts left of my original body are my elbows.
  • My Playtex Living bra died … of starvation.
  • I never made Who’s Who, but I’m featured in What’s That?” (1) 

I (Dawn) have found that some  women have unrealistic expectations about plastic surgery and other external “miracle” procedures to procure “beauty.” Those who believe all the advertising and hype about beauty fail to understand that physical beauty won’t last, but true inner beauty is both attractive and eternal.

Arlene doesn’t condemn botox or other procedures, but she does offer words of wisdom.

“Having cosmetic surgery will change your appearance, but it won’t change your life,” she Women with Inner Beatysaid. “Friend, if you’re not enough without plastic surgery, you’ll never be enough with it. You were lovingly and beautifully created by God. If you feel insecure about your appearance, the true transformation of beauty will first happen in your mind and heart, not on the surgery table.” (2)

I am tempted to stop right there. Arlene said it all. We are awed by women with true, inner beauty. Refined by their Creator and Heavenly Father, joy radiates from their lives.

I’m just going to add some scriptures to encourage you, if you struggle with your appearance. (All are in the English Standard Version.)

  • …For the Lord sees not as man sees: man looks on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart.” (1 Samuel 16:7b)
  • I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. (Psalm 139:14)
  • Charm is deceitful, and beauty is vain, but a woman who fears the Lord is to be praised.  (Proverbs 31:30)
  • So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. (2 Corinthians 4:16)
  • Do not let your adorning be external—the braiding of hair and the putting on of gold jewelry, or the clothing you wear— but let your adorning be the hidden person of the heart with the imperishable beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which in God’s sight is very precious.  (1 Peter 3:3-4)

Arlene concludes her book with these words, “Looking and feeling younger is about accepting your appearance, embracing your God-given age, and doing your best to improve your assets. Hear the voice of your heavenly Father as He looks at you, His daughter, and proclaims, ‘Good.’ … You are a luminous work in progress.”

Luminous. I like that.

We are told to let our “light” shine so others will glorify the Father in heaven (Matthew 5:16). So, shine, Friend … you are BEAUTIFUL!

(1) Arlene Pellicane, 31 Days to a Younger You: No surgery, No Diets, No Kidding (Harvest House Publishers, 2010), p. 97

(2) ibid, p. 98

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