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The Doctor Is In

7 Jan

One day, Emma felt terribly ill, so she was glad her doctor was in. The doctor checked her out, prescriptions_orangepills_dmwilson_lolwithgodsmiled, and then left the room.

A few minutes later, the doctor’s assistant returned with three bottles of pills. Emma looked surprised.

“You need to take the green pill with a big glass of water when you first wake up,” the medical assistant said. “Then take the yellow pill with water after lunch. And right before you head to bed, take the orange pill with another glass of water.”

Emma, suddenly overcome with fear, blurted out, “This is terrible! What’s wrong with me? Why do I have to take so much medicine?”

“Oh, it’s not about the meds,” the assistant said. “You’re just not drinking enough water!”

LOL!

Sometimes the simplest solutions are best, but we miss them. So we get a lot of “prescriptions” that are likely unnecessary.

[Don’t misunderstand me. I am all for medical prescriptions that are needed, often crucial. But some healing doesn’t require “meds” at all. Spiritually speaking, there might be something else we’re missing.]

God, our Great Physician, hears our hurts and HE is the best prescription for our “heart needs.”

We may clamor for other “prescriptions.” We may think we need something from God. But the truth is, we need God Himself.

Jesus said, “apart from me, you can do nothing” (John 15:5).

But He also said, “You refuse to come to me” (John 5:40). (Foolish, right?)

That second scripture is true of lost humanity that rejects Christ. But in one sense, it’s also true for the believer.

We scurry around looking for other solutions in our times of need. Sometimes we even make good things—our church, our Bibles, our ministry—little gods in our lives, hoping they can solve our issues.

We only come running to the Lord when all else fails us. We’re so slow to learn.

John 15:5 is changing my life. I keep telling myself, over and over, “Remember: without Jesus, you can’t do anything!”

I know in my heart this is true for all of us.

Even our goodness, apart from Jesus, is like filthy rags (Isaiah 64:6a).

Our best efforts are futile because they won’t last; nothing is eternal that is not connected to Him (1 John 2:17; 2 Peter 3:10-12).

John Piper shared the example of a paralyzed man who could do nothing for himself but talk. But a strong and reliable friend came to live with the man and help him. The paralyzed man had nothing but praise for this caring friend.

That is how I must see my state.

I can do nothing apart from the grace of God. But who can tell what I might do IN His grace?

I can only bear fruit in my life and ministry when I come to God in prayer in my time of need (Hebrews 4:16) and rest in my position in Christ.* And when I do, this glorifies the Father (John 15:7-8). And my heart fills with praise to Him.

The Doctor is in, but we must come to Him.

Is there any area of your life where you’re still trying to go it alone? Do you need a “come to the Doctor” moment?

* Some of the scriptures that tell the believer what it’s like to be “in Christ” – Romans 8:1-2; Ephesians 1:3; 2:6; Colossians 1:13; 3:1, 3; Philippians 4:13.

Also: see my Heart Choices Today post about being “in Christ.”

~ Dawn

 

 

 

Are You a Patient ‘Patient’?

27 Feb

There are so many LOL opportunities at a doctor’s waiting room.

“Adam, an elderly man was seated in the doctor’s waiting room. When he was called in to see the doctor, Adam slowly got up, and, grasping his cane and hunching over, slowly made his way into theOldManWithCane_TheMiracle examining room.

“After only a few minutes, Adam emerged from the room, walking completely upright. Paul, another patient who had watched him hobble into the room all hunched over, stared in amazement.

“‘That must be a miracle doctor in there.’ he exclaimed. ‘What treatment did he give you? What’s his secret?’

Adam stared at Paul and said, ‘Well, the doctor looked me up and down, analysed the situation, and gave me a cane that was four inches longer than the one I had been using.’*

LOL! Things are not always what they seem, are they?

I’ve been in a lot of doctor’s offices lately, and I’ve started wondering if I’m a patient patient.

Not long ago, I watched a crabby old man complain and complain and COMPLAIN! He griped about the time he had to wait. He sniped at the receptionist. In general, he was a miserable guy and determined to make others in the waiting room uncomfortable too.

He wasn’t a patient patient.

And as I sat there thinking about how I felt watching him, I started thinking about how I act as a “patient” of the Great Physician. As God is working to heal my soul and sanctify my life–to make me more like Jesus–I get so impatient sometimes.

But God is teaching me three things:

1. I need to “wait” on the Lord with anticipation and hope.

Waiting as the Bible describes it is a positive experience–or it’s supposed to be.  Here are just a few of the scriptures that teach us this truth:

  • “Make me to know your ways, O Lord; teach me your paths. Lead me in your truth and teach me, for you are the God of my salvation; for you I wait all the day long” (Psalm 25:4-5)
  • “Wait for the Lord; be strong, and let your heart take courage; wait for the Lord!” (Psalm 27:14).
  • “The Lord is good to those who wait for him, to the soul who seeks him” (Lamentations 3:25).
  • “But as for me, I will look to the Lord; I will wait for the God of my salvation; my God will hear me” (Micah 7:7).
  • Our soul waits for the Lord; he is our help and our shield. For our heart is glad in him, because we trust in his holy name. Let your steadfast love, O Lord, be upon us, even as we hope in you” (Psalm 33:20-22).

That doesn’t mean there’s no suffering in the wait (Psalm 40:1-3; Colossians 1:11), but rather that God will use hard circumstances to build strength of character in us when the going gets tough . . .IF we are turning to Him to get through them.

A.W. Tozer said, “Problems patiently endured will work for our spiritual perfecting.”

The truth is, while we wait we can still choose to set aside bitter complaining and rejoice in the Lord.

“… we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope” (Romans 5:3-4).

We don’t have to act like that grumpy old guy in the waiting room!

2. I need to remember the Great Physician knows what is best for my life.

I need to relax in Him … rest in Him (Isaiah 30:15) if I want to experience His deliverance and strength. The blessing is, God can make us “fruitful” even in our times of affliction (Genesis 41:52b).

The One who sees the beginning and ending of time knows what is best, and I believe He “who began a good work” in His own will “bring it to completion” when Jesus returns (Philippians 1:6).

3. I need to practice patient trust.

I need ditch my pride and stop trying to make all the elements of my life work the way I want them to. Instead, I need to exercise faith that God will accomplish His purposes in me (Hebrews 11:1). I need to practice patience daily.

God’s thoughts are above my thoughts (Isaiah 55:8), so I need to trust His wisdom and rest in His sovereign care.

Trusting God is releasing our lives to His control. It’s understanding His work may take some time, and it may not follow our agenda. 

Years ago, a friend of mine (also named Dawn) shared this poem with me and it stuck with me, deep in my heart:

“Just as my child brings his broken toys with tears for me to mend,
I took my broken dreams to God because He was my friend.
But then instead of leaving Him in peace to work alone,
I hung around and tried to help with ways that were my own.
At last I snatched them back and cried, ‘How could you be so slow?’
‘What could I do, my child? ‘ He said. ‘You never did let go’.” **

Oh, how we need to practice the patience of faith!

Are you a patient patient? What can you do to better trust the One who loves you and desires to heal and change your life for His glory?

 * Humor – Will and Guy’s Selection of Clean Doctor’s Jokes.

** Poem by Junior Frontilus

– Dawn

This Year: A Simpler, More Authentic Faith

2 Jan

I love the simplicity of a dog’s life.

Think about it. All they care about is food,  affection, someone to chase and a soft couch. And maybe the freedom to bark.

I think my dog might be praying . . .

Dear God:

  • Can you make my master give me more turkey and less dressing?YorkshireTerrier_DearGod_Pixabay
  • Is it OK if I kiss my human after I chew on his underwear?
  • In heaven, will I have to apologize to the mailman… and the trash collector … and all the others I’ve chased?
  • When I get up there, can I sit on your couch? Or is it off limits too?
  • If I bark like crazy and nobody hears me, am I still considered a “bad dog”? (1)

Yes … a dog’s life is so simple. Actually, our lives could be too, I think.

Confucius say“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.”

I’m one of those people who complicates things in the midst of simplifying them.

Ask me to clean off a shelf and I’ll make labels and add “separators” and categorize everything. Ask me to purge a closet and I’ll do that, but I’ll also add dividers between sleeveless, short-sleeved and long-sleeved blouses … and … you get the idea.

I’m never satisfied with doing “just enough” or “bottom line.” I’ve always got to add something.

Actually, that works pretty well for me most of the time. At least, it keeps me organized.

ChildlikeFaith_MachenQuote_PixabayGraphic_LOLwithGod-blogBut I’m learning an important lesson about faith.

Whenever I try to add anything to faith, it complicates and even diminishes what could be a beautifully simple thing.

American Presbyterian theologian John Gresham Machen wrote:

“The more we know of God, the more unreservedly we will trust Him; the greater our progress in theology, the simpler and more child-like will be our faith.” (2)

Better yet, Jesus said, “… ‘Truly, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 18:3-4, ESV).

Oh, the simple, humble faith of a little child.

I read about two little girls, playmates, who were counting their pennies.

One girl said, “I have five pennies.”

The other bragged, “I have ten.”

“No,” the first little girl corrected, “You only have five pennies too.”

“But,” the second child quickly noted, “My father said when he comes home tonight, he’s going to give me five more pennies. So I really have ten cents.” (3)

The little girl’s faith was all the proof she needed, though she did not yet have what she hoped for. Why? She believed her father!

Faith is the substance–the confidence–of things we’ve hoped for. Faith gives us assurance or conviction about things we cannot yet see. (Hebrews 11:1). The question is, do we believe our Father in heaven?

There’s a huge difference between childish (immature, unreflective) faith, and child-like faith that says, “I believe and trust my ‘Abba’ (Daddy).” Our faith, to appear authentic to a watching world, must express itself in whole-hearted, whole-minded confidence in the One who loves and cares for us.

We can ask questions of our Father–in fact, He invites all humble inquiries. Christians are not brain-dead zombies. But there is no fear of the unknown when we still have unanswered questions. We have the confidence that what we cannot know, our Father already knows. We can walk on in child-like faith, leaning on God’s wisdom and purposes.

Frank J. Exley wrote a poem that blesses me whenever I am tempted to complicate this simple faith (emphasis mine):

Child of My love, fear not the unknown morrow,
Dread not the new demand life makes of thee;
Thy ignorance doth hold no cause for sorrow
Since what thou knowest not is known to Me.

Thou canst not see today the hidden meaning
Of My command, but thou the light shalt gain;
Walk on in faith, upon My promise leaning,
And as thou goest all shall be made plain.

One step thou sayest—then go forward boldly,
One step is far enough for faith to see;
Take that, and thy next duty shall be told thee,
For step by step thy Lord is leading thee.

Stand not in fear, thy adversaries counting,
Dare every peril, save to disobey;
Thou shalt march on, all obstacles surmounting,
For I, the Strong, will open up the way.

Wherefore go gladly to the task assigned thee;
Having My promise, needing nothing more
Than just to know, where’er the future find thee,
In all thy journeying I go before. (4)

Do you have this kind of simple, authentic faith as you face uncertain days?

– Dawn

(1) Adapted from http://danesonline.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-30718.html

 (2) Machen quote.

(3) Adapted from an illustration:  Otterbein Teacher–Encyclopedia of Illustrations, #3352.

(4) “Step by Step” by Frank J. Exley, Bible Truth Publishers.

Graphics adapted from photos at Pixabay.

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