Tag Archives: God’s Word

Gobble, Gobble, Gobble …

18 Nov

I remember a Thanksgiving Day long ago when my grade school-aged boys were into kids’ joke books. Have you ever heard these silly “turkey jokes”?

Such as:

Q: Which side of the turkey has the most feathers? A. The outside!

Q: Who is never hungry on Thanksgiving? A. The turkey, because he’s already stuffed!

Q: When is turkey soup bad for your health? A. When you’re the turkey.

Q. Where do you find a turkey with no legs? A. Exactly where you left him.

And totally silly . . .

Q: Why don’t you put the turkey near the corn? A: Because he will gobble, gobble, gobble it up!

I’ve had “gobbling” on the brain this week. I fully intend to gobble up some turkey and fixings next Thursday.

But there are some other, beneficial things I can “gobble up” too.

Join me in using the scriptures below to remind you to “gobble” up these godly priorities.

I can…

1. Gobble Up Time with the Lord.

Be still and exalt Him! Psalm 46:10; Psalm 62:1

Draw near to Him and repent of sin. James 4:8

Pray expecting God to answer. Matthew 6:6

Abide in the Lord. Psalm 91:1; John 15:4

2. Gobble Up the Word of God.

Delight in and meditate on scripture. Psalm 1:2

Strengthen your heart against temptation. Psalm 119:9, 11

Handle scripture wisely; study it! 2 Timothy 2:15

3. Gobble Up Resources (books, videos, Podcasts, etc.) with Solid Doctrine.

Don’t forsake solid teaching. Proverbs 4:2

Avoid diverse/strange teachings. Hebrews 13:9a; 2 Timothy 4:3

Hold firm to and teach the “trustworthy” Word & sound doctrine. Titus 1:9; 2:1

4. Gobble Up Memories with Family Members.

Honor parents—show respect and let them tell their stories. Exodus 20:12;

Create a legacy for your children, your “heritage” from God. Psalm 127:3-5

Be wise in parenting. Ephesians 6:1-4; Proverbs 6:20

Pass on your love for the Lord and His ways. Psalm 103:17

5. Gobble Up Inspiring Opportunities with Friends.

Choose friends carefully. Proverbs 13:20

Treasure loving, loyal friends. Proverbs 17:17

Seek Accountability from wise friends. Proverbs 27:5-6; 17

Give thanks for the friend who lifts you up! Ecclesiastes 4:9-10

6. Gobble Up Open Doors to Minister to Others.

Love sacrificially. John 15:12-13

Obey the Lord—His purposes for you. John 15:14-15

Watch your attitudes. Colossians 3:12-14

Embrace God’s way of love. 1 Corinthians 13:4-8a

Practice the “one anothersof scripture: love one another, encourage one another, serve one another, etc.

Don’t take a day for granted. Practice the priorities of scripture and seek the Lord. Enjoy Him!

Gobble up the life He’s given you!

What do you need to gobble up more of this year? Focus on that as you consider ways to express your gratitude this Thanksgiving.

 – Dawn

 – Graphic of turkey, courtesy of Pixabay.

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Oh, Those Questionable Choices!

15 Jan

I love the Prego® Spaghetti sauce ads. A recent one, “Questionable Choices: Hair Style” made me laugh as the woman in the commercial says, “I wonder what other questionable choices I’ve made” and then she recalls a few outlandish hairdos.

Ah yes,  I remember some of the over-the-top hair styles from the past! (I had so many good hair role models!)Poodle_CollegeHairdo_LOLwithGod

  • Remember “big hair”?
  • Remember the “beehive”?
  • Remember the “hair flip”?
  • Remember the “Farrah”?

My personal favorite was the “Split-level.” I wore a sad, curly version of that in college. It was a short, poofed-up bob in the front with long hair cascading over my shoulders. (No, I will not post a photo of me … but I looked a lot like this French Poodle to the right!)

Yes, I made lots of questionable hair choices.

And some questionable money choices.

And questionable food choices, like:

  • Taking a perfectly good bowl of simple Greek yogurt and “confusing” it with honey, chopped walnuts and 1/4 cup of mini chocolate chips!
  • And eating half a bag of potato chips. Not a mini bag … a big family-sized bag.
  • And eating half a carton of raspberry sherbet, because I wanted to clear out the freezer for a diet. (HUH?)

I discovered recently an important concept: I might have waited far too long to eat healthy. Now, with an itsy-bit of hope left, I’m beginning to eat green, lean and clean—trying to regain my health. The jury’s still out on whether I’ll be successful.

I am living out that convicting Dutch proverb, “We grow too soon old and too late smart.”

The decisions that bother me most are my past questionable spiritual choices.

Most of my ministry days I’ve promoted good, wise, godly choices. But that doesn’t mean I’ve always lived them. The sorry truth is:

We can uphold and promote truth to others while failing to live purely by truth ourselves, but sooner or later our fleshly hypocrisy will catch up with us.

I think it’s sad that:

  • I’ve promoted peace while living with anxiety;
  • I’ve promoted rest while working unreasonable hours;
  • I’ve promoted joy while struggling with depression; and
  • I’ve promoted love while protecting my own agenda.

Before you judge me too harshly, what have you promoted while … doing something else?

I understand I’ll never be perfect this side of heaven, but I know there are four things I can do to live a more authentic life.

1. I Can Keep It Real.

I can make an intentional effort to tell the truth about my own life. I can be honest, not telling people I’m living one way while living another.

God never lies, and He expects me to be truthful too. I’m not to deceive others about my spiritual state.

I can honestly say I am pure, holy, loving, wise, etc. . . . in Christ. But left to myself, I’m a mess. Authentic people do not excuse their sin; they confess it (1 John 1:8-9).

The process of personal sanctification (progressively becoming like Jesus) is the work of God in us that begins at the moment we trust in His Son.

But we don’t sit around like a lump on a pickle. All our doctrines can be right, but people need to see the changes – the practical side of Christianity.

Consider these words:

“People who equate orthodoxy with authenticity find it hard to even consider the possibility that, despite the correctness of all their doctrinal positions, they may have missed the deepest reality of the authentic Christian life. But we must never forget that true Christianity is more than teaching—it is a way of life.” ~ Ray C. Stedman

We will make progress in becoming more like Christ as we rest in and obey the promptings of the Holy Spirit and the wisdom of the Word of God, and as we become Jesus’ disciple (Romans 12:1-2; Ephesians 4:14-16; 2 Peter 3:17-18; Luke 9:23-24). Basically, the Lord must increase and we must decrease (John 3:30). “We are now children of God,” John said, “and what we will be has not yet appeared” (1 John 3:2).

I will be totally changed, but I have not “arrived” yet. Neither have you.

2. I Can Live a More Others-Focused Life.

My authenticity must, at its roots, include a desire to help others who are caught in the the miserable muck and mire of sin. It’s not only “there but for the grace of God go I,” but a more brokenhearted, “Let me share how the grace of God is rescuing me … and He can rescue you too!”

In my testimony of grace, I can explain how I am realizing the consequences of my questionable choices, and how choosing God’s ways is a far better way to live.

In the midst of this choosing, I must remember I can choose nothing apart from God’s Spirit working in my life. He says, “… apart from Me, you can do nothing” (John 15:4-6). (I have nothing but praise that He is always working in my life!)

3. I Can Seek and Embrace God’s Wisdom.

“The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom and the knowledge of the Holy One is insight” (Proverbs 9:10). I must seek God and “fear” (honor, revere, worship) Him. Again, I cannot hope to live the “Christian life” apart from having a proper relationship to God.

And neither can you.

God’s wisdom will keep us from foolish pride and all the questionable choices that come from fearing man—wanting to impress people more than living for the Lord and His Kingdom (Proverbs 29:25).

When we hide God’s Word in our hearts (memorization, meditation) we will have greater resources and “light” to make wise decisions (Psalm 119:105) and not sin (119:11). It’s an intentional choice!

Bible study will help us recognize godly wisdom as we “rightly divide” the word of truth (2 Timothy 2:15). Knowing and obeying God’s truth can bring us freedom (John 8:31-32). We are to take every thought “captive” to the obedience of Christ (2 Corinthians 10:3-5)—not entertaining foolish thinking—and control our thoughts and behaviors (Colossians 3:1-6; Philippians 4:8-9) because of who we are in Christ.

4. I Can Remember the End Game.

In the words of an old songwriter, “This world is not my home, I’m just a passin’ through.” It’s true! I’m headed for eternity with my Father God.

As a biblical Christian, knowing that this life is a journey to my heavenly home and that I will someday stand to account for my life (Romans 14:12; 2 Corinthians 5:10), I understand my future reality should dictate the choices of my present reality.

If we remember this is not all there is, we will be motivated to examine and consider our ways and turn to the Lord (Lamentations 3:402 Corinthians 13:5).

As we seek and rely on the Lord, He can enable us to make less questionable choices and more God-honoring ones!

Which of these four points would help you make better choices today?

Dawn

 

 

 

 

Picky Eating Habits

13 Jun

One of the most frustrating things about being a mom of toddlers is theChewingOnGodsWord_LOLwithGod little ones’ eating habits. A blog called Mommy Shorts posted moms’ submissions about their children’s picky eating habits. Here are my favorites:

  • Hello, my name is Julia, and tomorrow I will hate every food I liked today.
  • Hello, my name is Lexi, and I will gag at the sight of sauce, except if you call it frosting. I love pasta frosting.
  • Hello, my name is Gabe, and I will not eat scrambled eggs unless you spell my name out in ketchup next to them.
  • Hello, my name is Wyatt, and I like my milk separate from my cereal so I can treat it like a dip.
  • Hello, my name is Olivia, and I hate crust. Not just on bread and pizza. Did you know there is crust on pancakes and hot dog rolls too?
  • Hello, my name is Xander, and if I find one string on my banana, I will cry like you chopped off my leg.
  • Hello, my name is Atlee, and I like toast with butter, but not if I see you putting the butter on my toast. You must butter my toast in the pantry, in another room or outside, because if I see you put butter on it, I will not eat it. And don’t get the crazy idea that I like dry toast. I do not. I like toast with sneaky butter on it.
  • [More “picky eaters” here.]

Ah those sweet days of feeding toddlers . . .

Toddlers’ food choices can drive us crazy. Of course, those picky eaters don’t think they’re being picky. In their little minds, they’re being discerning gourmets!

I read a scripture that made me think about what I “eat” each day.

“Your words were found, and I ate them, and your words became to me a joy and the delight of my heart, for I am called by your name, O Lord, God of hosts” (Jeremiah 15:16, ESV).

It’s a choice. I can either eat the world’s foolish words—and go hungry nonetheless—or I can feast on the satisfying, wise words God has provided for me.

Chewing on God’s Word is a matter of being a discerning picky eater.

We have a choice every day about what we will read and the media we devour. Our choices will affect our lives.

If we are wise stewards of God’s time and of our minds, we will make choices that the world might consider “picky.” But that shouldn’t concern us.

If we want to model Christ to the world, we will want lives that are transformed by the renewing of our minds (Romans 12:1-2). We need to “test” literature and media—and “discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.”

The Psalmist said, “How sweet are your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth!” (Psalm 119:103), and the patriarch, Job, said he treasured God’s words more than his actual “portion of food” (Job 23:12). They “ate” the Word and were satisfied.

We may have second thoughts about other things we’ve read, but we will never regret “chewing” on scripture.

Do you eat God’s words every day? How has He blessed and encouraged you by them?

– Dawn

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